The wonderful world of listening to the radio

Tag: DSC (Page 2 of 3)

QSL JRCC Sweden 2187.5 kHz

Göteborg and Stockholm Radio can be received regularly on 2187.5 kHz with DSC messages. As I already had QSLs from the 80-ies for I didn’t bother to send a reception report and QSL request for these two stations. But then I saw a QSL from Artur at MaresmeDX for JRCC Sweden. And I wondered how they are actually organized these days.

Within an hour of sending my reception report for a reception of MMSI 002653000, Göteborg Radio on 2187.5 kHz to jrcc@sjofartsverket.se I got an answer:

So it seems that everything on MF is now under the jurisdiction of JRCC Sweden. The HF band isn’t covered anymore. And I guess that the name Stockholm Radio is used for VHF DSC watch and weather broadcasts: https://stockholmradio.se/ .

In the 80-ies you could listen to a couple of stations on MF. In addition to Göteborg (SAG) and Stockholm Radio (SDJ) I remember Karlskrona (SAA), Härnosand (SAH) and Tingstaede (Visby, SAE). The nice thing was that they had matching set of QSL cards. But although I heard all stations, I managed to get the QSLs for Göteborg and Stockholm Radio only…

1982 QSL Göteborg Radio SAG (1785 kHz)
1980s (I’ve two, both no details) QSL Stockholm Radio SDJ

QSL Varna Radio LZW 16804.5 kHz

Two weeks after sending my report I received an email with a QSL letter for Varna Radio, call sign LZW, broadcasting a DSC message on 16804.5 kHz. I sent my report to varnaradio@bgports.bg .

It is always interesting to see how coastal radio and GMDSS (Global Maritime Distress and Safety System) monitoring is organized. From what I’ve seen it is usually an integrated part of the Coast Guard, which is either integrated in a Department of Transport or in the National Navy. In the case of Varna Radio however the station is embedded in the National Port Authority: Bulgarian Ports Infrastructure Co.

QSL Letter Varna Radio LZW Bulgaria
QSL Letter Varna Radio LZW Bulgaria

The signature of the QSL was attached in a separate picture:

QSL Iqaluit Coast Guard Radio 12577 kHz

QSL Iqaluit Coast Guard Radio, Canada
e-QSL from Iqaluit Coast Guard Radio, Canada

For my reception of a DSC message I received this beautiful QSL for Iqaluit Coast Guard Radio on 12577 kHz. I sent my report to: IQANORDREG@innav.gc.ca .

The duty officer apologized for taking so long to reply (about 5 months) but they had a very busy season. Of course that’s no problem at all and I’m grateful for the service they provide to us listeners. They also wrote that they enjoy receiving letters from all around the world!

As far as I know all DSC communications on shortwave (4 MHz and higher) are coordinated via Iqaluit, the capital of Nunavut in Canada. The station in Prince Rupert seems to be the only exception to the rule. I’m not sure what the status of the Canadian mediumwave Coast Guard stations is these days. In the 80-ies and 90-ies I could regularly hear them in SSB on 2182 kHz. But I don’t see any of them listed with DSC. So my guess is that, like their counterparts in the USA, distress calls are no longer monitored on medium wave.

QSL CCR Las Palmas 8414.5 kHz

e QSL Las Palmas Radio
e QSL card from Las Palmas Radio

Coast Guard Radio in Spain is remotely operated from three centers: Coruna, Valencia and Las Palmas. This e-QSL CCR Las Palmas confirms my reception of the latter, operating from the Canary Islands on 8414.5 kHz. It was my 2nd attempt to get a QSL from this station via ccr.laspalmas@cellnextelecom.com , so maybe they reply a little bit irregular.

Unfortunately the e QSL doesn’t show the station name, so I have to save the email that went with it in my files as well:

Email accompanying the e-QSL for Las Palmas Radio

QSL Cyprus Radio 5BA 8414.5 kHz

A real QSL card for Cyprus Radio 5BA on 8414.5 kHz. I heard this coastal station with a DSC message. It is nice that they still award QSL cards by mail. Forty years ago they were also reliable verifiers. I attached an old QSL letter from 1982 for a reception of a broadcast in A1 (Morse code).

QSL Cyprus Radio Nicosia Cyprus
Nice QSL card from Cyprus Radio 5BA, Nicosia, Cyprus
QSL Cyprus Radio 5BA, Nicosia
QSL Cyprus Radio Nicosia 5BA Cyprus
1982 QSL for Cyprus or Nicosia Radio 5BA, Cyprus

QSL Olympia Radio SVO 8414.5 kHz

Earlier this year I received this nice e QSL Olympia Radio with call sign SVO. My report was for a DSC message on 8414.5 kHz. I sent my QSL to olympiaradio@ote.gr . Like in many countries maritime or coastal radio stations in Greece merged into one station: Olympia Radio. Occasionally I do see other MMSI station identifiers popping up like for example Aspropyrgis Radio, but as far as I know everything is centrally controlled since 1998.

QSL Olympia Radio SVO, Greece
e QSL from martime station Olympia Radio/SVO, Greece

As said, in the past there were multiple radio stations. Athens (SVA) was the station operating on both MF and HF. Iraklion (SVH), Limnos (SVL), Kerkyra (SVK), Rhodos (SVR) and Chios (SVX) were operating on MF only. Of those Kerkyra was most frequently received in the Netherlands. Below you can see the QSLs I received in the 80-ies from Athens and Kerkyra Radio.

1982 QSL Athens Radio SVA, Greece
1982 QSL from Athens Radio SVA, Greece
1988 QSL Kerkyra Radio, Greece
1988 QSL from Kerkyra Radio SVK, Korfu Island, Greece

QSL Torshavn Radio 2187.5 kHz

I started this weblog a few months after I resumed DX-ing. As a result there are a few QSLs that I didn’t post yet. One of those is this comprehensive Word document I received as QSL Torshavn Radio. Torshavn Radio – call sign OXJ – is part of the MRCC (Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre) on the Faroe Islands. I received them with a DSC test message on 2187.5 kHz. It is a pity that they forgot to tick the DSC box on the document, but I applaud them for sending this neat QSL. I sent my report to MRCC@vorn.fo.

QSL Torshavn Radio, Faroe Islands
E-QSL letter from Torshavn Radio, Faroe Islands

The Faroe Islands are part of the Kingdom of Denmark, but with a very high degree of self-governance. They are not part of the European Union. The debate on whether they should become fully independent of Denmark lingers on… For us DX-ers and QSL-hunters that doesn’t make a difference: the European DX council has long declared it a separate radio country.

QSL Taupo Radio 8414.5 kHz

Last night I received Taupo Radio, New Zealand, with a DSC message on 8414.5 kHz. Within the hour I received a polite email confirming my reception report via maritime@kordia.co.nz .

QSL email Taupo Radio DSC New Zealand
Email QSL from Taupo Radio, New Zealand

Now obviously I’m very grateful that operators of Taupo Radio took the time to send me answer. I do realize that replying to reception reports is not their core business. Many stations don’t even bother… But while a reply within the hour is an example of efficiency, it also makes me longing for the old days and it raises some concern…

In 1989 I received Awarua Radio, ZLB. It was one of 4 coastal radio stations in New Zealand, and it was the one that covered HF. So with proper propagation conditions you could pick up their CW signals. Yep, we were still on morse code. I think rationalization kicked in between 1991 and 1994, and 4 stations became one: Taupo Radio. And in itself that was not a bad thing. You can learn a bit more on this site about NZ coastal radio station history and here on Awarua Radio in particular.

At the time my reception report took about three weeks to land on their desk and another three weeks for an envelope to drop in the mailbox. The days we worked with printers if not typewriters. When there was no email and we had to rely on airmail. But I received a comprehensive letter with lots of information about the station, their transmitters, the receivers (JRC NRD515s – nice detail is that I made today’s Radio Taupo reception on my 30 years old JRC NRD 535!). And a beautiful QSL card that displayed pride in the coastal radio stations of New Zealand.

QSL Awarua Radio New Zealand
Proud of your Coast Radio Station… the QSL of Awarua Radio shows it!

And that is what is lacking today. Call me an old dude, a radio geek whatever… but I do think it is an opportunity missed. Driven by efficiency and bureaucrats who don’t understand the difference between a Volt and an Ampere there is no more space and time for pride and passion in engineering and technology and what it brings society… How much effort would it take to just include one promotional picture in an email from an interested listener? Promotion has never been so easy…
And that – as a PhD Physics and retired technology manager – worries me… How are we going to foster interest in engineering studies so much needed in western society? Your thoughts? Leave a comment!

QSL Awarua Radio New Zealand
The back of the QSL: Awarua Radio was the HF presence in a network of 4 coastal radio stations

QSL Bremen Rescue 2187.5 kHz

Earlier this year I received this beautiful QSL Bremen Rescue 2187.5 kHz. I really appreciate DSC stations (and other stations) that offer this service. Somehow I do hope that it helps younger people to develop an interest in the hobby and therefore in radio and electronics. I sent my report to mail@mrcc-bremen.de .

QSL MRCC Bremen 2187.5 kHz
QSL from MRCC Bremen on 2187.5 kHz.
QSL Bremen Rescue on 2187.5 kHz
QSL Bremen Rescue on 2187.5 kHz

QSL Tokyo Coast Guard 12577 kHz

For my reception report of Tokyo Coast Guard from Japan on 12577 kHz I received this nice QSL letter. I heard Tokyo Coast Guard with a DSC message as you might already have guessed.

I added two dollars to cover return postage. They were donated to the Blue Feather Donation as you can read in the letter. Two blue feathers accompanied the QSL: pretty cool!

QSL Tokyo Coast Guard Radio Japan
QSL Tokyo Coast Guard Radio, Japan

Thanks to Hugo Matten who confirmed to use the address below:
Japan Coast Guard,  2-1-3, Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8976,  Japan 

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